Why hello there. 

I'm Brad, a creative strategist living in Chicago. This is a steady stream of things I make, see and think.

Highlights from the worlds of advertising, startups, comedy, space, Internet hijinx, and my life in Chicago.

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Mobilizing The 12th Man - Case Study

When political unrest meant soccer players in Tunisia would have to play a major match in an empty arena their fans turned to a mobile app to bring their voices together and support their home team.

Honestly, this is powerful stuff.

futurist-foresight:

What a great addition to any 3D printing operating  - a tool to prepare your own plastic for printing.
berlinfarmlab:

American college student Tyler McNaney has invented a desktop machine that makes the raw materials for 3D printing by grinding up waste plastic from bottles, wrappers and even Lego bricks.
link


WOAH. If this delivers on that promise…

futurist-foresight:

What a great addition to any 3D printing operating  - a tool to prepare your own plastic for printing.

berlinfarmlab:

American college student Tyler McNaney has invented a desktop machine that makes the raw materials for 3D printing by grinding up waste plastic from bottles, wrappers and even Lego bricks.

link

WOAH. If this delivers on that promise…

(via futurist-foresight)

poptech:

The future of education in Africa is mobile

While education struggles to cope, mobile communication has grown exponentially. Africa is today the fastest growing and second largest mobile phone market in the world. While in some countries – including Botswana, Gabon and Namibia – there are more mobile subscriptions than inhabitants, Africa still has the lowest mobile penetration of any market. There is plenty more growth to come. Over 620 million mobile subscriptions mean that for the first time in the history of the continent, its people are connected.
These connections offer an opportunity for education. Already, we are starting to see the beginnings of change. An increasing number of initiatives – some large-scale, some small – are using mobile technologies to distribute educational materials, support reading, and enable peer-to-peer learning and remote tutoring through social networking services. Mobiles are streamlining education administration and improving communication between schools, teachers and parents. The list goes on. Mobile learning, either alone or in combination with existing education approaches, is supporting and extending education in ways not possible before.


Mobile + Africa (and most developing regions) = The decade’s most transformational force    High-res

poptech:

The future of education in Africa is mobile

While education struggles to cope, mobile communication has grown exponentially. Africa is today the fastest growing and second largest mobile phone market in the world. While in some countries – including Botswana, Gabon and Namibia – there are more mobile subscriptions than inhabitants, Africa still has the lowest mobile penetration of any market. There is plenty more growth to come. Over 620 million mobile subscriptions mean that for the first time in the history of the continent, its people are connected.

These connections offer an opportunity for education. Already, we are starting to see the beginnings of change. An increasing number of initiatives – some large-scale, some small – are using mobile technologies to distribute educational materials, support reading, and enable peer-to-peer learning and remote tutoring through social networking services. Mobiles are streamlining education administration and improving communication between schools, teachers and parents. The list goes on. Mobile learning, either alone or in combination with existing education approaches, is supporting and extending education in ways not possible before.

Mobile + Africa (and most developing regions) = The decade’s most transformational force 

Today we stand at the Information Age’s frontier: the Hybrid Age. The Hybrid Age is a new sociotechnical era that is unfolding as technologies merge with each other and humans merge with technology ⎯ both at the same time. Information technology’s exponentially increasing power is propelling other fields forward at accelerating rates, allowing them to transcend their individual limitations in scale and speed. This applies to DNA sequencing, 3-D printing and manufacturing, and almost every other technological sphere. Other fields are also helping IT to accelerate, even potentially overcoming Moore’s Law, which predicted that integrated-circuit capacity doubles approximately every two years. Microprocessors are now reaching the physical limitation of two-dimensional silicon chips as transistors reach atomic size. Computer scientists are teaming up with physicists to explore subatomic quantum computing, in which electrons could become conduits of unique data; biologists have made breakthroughs in molecular computing, which uses enzymes and DNA strands to replace silicon chips altogether. Silicon Valley might soon be something of a misnomer as ever more companies and universities start investing in research on oxygen, carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus.The cross-pollination of leading-edge sectors such as information technology, biotechnology, pervasive computing, robotics, neuroscience and nanotechnology spells the end of certain turf wars over nomenclature.

It is neither the “Bio Age” nor the “Nano Age” nor the “Neuro Age,” but the hybrid of all of these at the same time. At the same time, our own relationship to technology is moving beyond the instrumental to the existential. There is an accelerating centripetal dance between what technologies are doing outside us and inside us. Externally, technology no longer simply processes our instructions on a one-way street. Instead, it increasingly provides intelligent feedback. Internally, we are moving beyond using technology only to dominate nature toward making ourselves the template for technology, integrating technologies within ourselves physically. We don’t just use technology; we absorb it.

The Hybrid Age – new TED book by technologist futurists Parag Khanna and Ayesha Khanna explores our co-evolution with technology. 

azizisbored:

This is amazing. Apparently there’s an Xbox game where you can play roles of different people in MTV shows, and Human Giant is one of them. This guy did my part in the sketch Escalating Interview (here’s the original sketch).

People who have this thing, please keep doing more Human Giant sketches and YouTubing it. Send em to us on twitter (@azizansari, @robhuebel, @paulscheer, or @jwoliner). 

paulscheer:

HUMAN GIANT ON YOOSTAR! 

This guy does a good AZIZ

Yoostar is a great indicator of how awesome video games are about to get. We have just scratched the surface.

(via azizisbored)

lonelysandwich:

RCA
She was a dependable cable, the RCA or phono connector. Been around since the 1940s, with her stout, sturdy pin you knew wasn’t going anywhere. You could trust her with your tapes and CDs and video games if that was your thing.
I just pulled out the last of my RCA cables. Now I’m left with a box of them—a quarter-mile of left, right, red, green and blue in six-foot segments, each with its own unique personality. This one’s for the record player. This one was for the cable box and these ones looked great with the SNES.
But I’m all HDMI now. Feels good, too. Feels right.

Nerd Nostalgia.   High-res

lonelysandwich:

RCA

She was a dependable cable, the RCA or phono connector. Been around since the 1940s, with her stout, sturdy pin you knew wasn’t going anywhere. You could trust her with your tapes and CDs and video games if that was your thing.

I just pulled out the last of my RCA cables. Now I’m left with a box of them—a quarter-mile of left, right, red, green and blue in six-foot segments, each with its own unique personality. This one’s for the record player. This one was for the cable box and these ones looked great with the SNES.

But I’m all HDMI now. Feels good, too. Feels right.

Nerd Nostalgia.

This is just… wow. Word Lens is in and of itself, a breathtaking app. 

But, the real story is how astonishingly different this is from anything I have ever seen. I can’t even begin to fathom the applications this technology will have over the near future.