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I'm Brad, a creative strategist living in Chicago. This is a steady stream of things I make, see and think.

Highlights from the worlds of advertising, startups, comedy, space, Internet hijinx, and my life in Chicago.

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I went to the Facebook mothership this week.  Posed like a tourist, took some pictures.

I also noticed that although Facebook’s campus was beautiful, they forgot to finish both sides of their sign.

Cheney references paid ad campaigns whose goal was to earn a Like using a “Like to enter” or “Like to qualify” conditions. “One direct effect of all this passive liking is an ugly messy data set with a bunch of implicit signals… that are wrong,” Cheney continues. The result might be that PF Chang’s is the most liked Chinese restaurant near you simply because it had a “Like our page to win some lo mein” promotion two years ago. “You simply can’t roll up recommendations for people, places, and interests into a service that’s one size fits all,” Cheney concludes.

You’re not gonna Like it: Facebook’s new search struggles with the real world

Facebook spent 5 years telling brands to whore for Likes and now it’s coming back to haunt them.

Facebook’s (thefacebook) First Media Kit (2004)

Before the IPO, before Timeline, before the Oscars, before privacy mattered, before they dropped the “the”, and before the world knew.

Before it all there were just a couple dudes, trying to contain tempest is a teapot. Trying to build the future and bring the world around for the ride.

Then Justin Timberlake had to ruin everything.

(Thanks Digiday for the scans)

Author William Powers suggested that the brain is set up to detect and respond to new stimuli — rewarding that mental process with a “dopamine squirt.” Powers argues that while the stimuli have changed in the last several thousand years — from woolly mammoths to Facebook updates – human brains still reward timely and accurate detection and response to new stimuli with dopamine.

Why Groupon Is Over and Facebook And Twitter Should Follow

Uh Oh, Facebook Is Losing Its Popularity - Technology - Rebecca Greenfield via The Atlantic Wire

stoweboyd:

This is inevitable, because Facebook is the new AOL:

Rebecca Greenfield via The Atlantic Wire

Over the last month, Facebook has not only seen a 1.1 percent drop in U.S. users, but a decline in 14 of the 23 countries where it has 50 percent penetration, found an analyst using tracking software. Beyond numbers though, another metric, the American Consumer Satisfaction Index, found over the last year the users that have stayed are less satisfied. Facebook scored a 61, which not only represents over a 7 percent decrease from one year ago, but puts it well below Google+.

The end will be sooner that most imagine: in three years, Facebook will be a has been.

Ditto.

thenextweb:

In a joint project by Facebook and design firm Definition6, TimelineMovieMaker will turn all of the posts on your Timeline into a really eye-catching movie, complete with special effects and music.
➤ TimelineMovieMaker
(More: Turn Your Facebook Timeline Into a Movie)

What I’ve Been Thinking About This Week:
2012 will be a year chock full of one-click services that transform your every timeline/tweet/check-in/tagged photo into all sorts of pretty little shareable packages. 
We painstakingly document a staggering amount of our lives but for the most part, the images and statements we broadcast are fleeting. We forget about them and move on. They disappear down the page as more and more is piled on top.
There are a lot of opportunities in unearthing these databases of self-documentation and finding ways of leveraging it to do something useful and/or fun. Bryce Roberts calls this sort of thing “personal time travel" and I think that’s pretty dead on.   High-res

thenextweb:

In a joint project by Facebook and design firm Definition6, TimelineMovieMaker will turn all of the posts on your Timeline into a really eye-catching movie, complete with special effects and music.

➤ TimelineMovieMaker

(More: Turn Your Facebook Timeline Into a Movie)

What I’ve Been Thinking About This Week:

2012 will be a year chock full of one-click services that transform your every timeline/tweet/check-in/tagged photo into all sorts of pretty little shareable packages. 

We painstakingly document a staggering amount of our lives but for the most part, the images and statements we broadcast are fleeting. We forget about them and move on. They disappear down the page as more and more is piled on top.

There are a lot of opportunities in unearthing these databases of self-documentation and finding ways of leveraging it to do something useful and/or fun. Bryce Roberts calls this sort of thing “personal time travel" and I think that’s pretty dead on.